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Kyle Funderburk / Photo by Kyle Funderburk 

Miracle Armstrong stands with her father after receiving the homecoming crown.


News
featured
Fair continues through Sept. 28

The Madison County Agricultural Fair continues through Saturday at the Comer Lions Club fairgrounds, 1254 Main Street (Hwy. 22), Comer.

Gates open nightly at 6 p.m. with a Saturday matinee for kids from noon to 4 p.m. The $4 gate admittance includes free grandstand entertainment and you can bring a pair of used eyeglasses, hearing aids or cell phones and get 50 cents off the gate price. Ages 5 and under are admitted free. The Saturday matinee features free entrance for children under 15 and $1 for all others.

Gate prizes are offered each evening and during the Saturday matinee (deposit your gate tickets in the barrel under the canopy and remember to save your stub). Drawings are held at 10 p.m. Thursday and at 11 p.m. on Friday and Saturday and organizers say you must be present to win.

James Gang Entertainment is providing entertainment on the midway featuring rides and games. Organizers say bring non-perishable food or monetary donations for the Madison County Food Bank to the Lions Club community booth and register to win two tickets to the Georgia/Kentucky football game on Oct. 19.

Participate in “Split-the-Pot” by guessing the number of peas in a jar for $1 per guess. The winner will be announced Saturday night and will split the money with the Madison-Oglethorpe Animal Shelter, organizers said, and you do not need to be present to win.

There are exhibits of handmade arts and crafts, community club and promotional exhibits, commercial business, agricultural equipment and vendors with various wares.

Special unlimited midway passes can be purchased Thursday and at the Saturday matinee for $15 each. Friday and Saturday unlimited ride passes are $20 each.

Fair organizers say be sure to visit the community and commercial exhibit buildings and look for the winning entries in each category.

The following is a list of daily highlights for the fair this year:

•Wednesday night will kick off with a FFA and 4-H goat and lamb show competition and The Nothin’ Nu Band will perform “everything old is new again” music on the grandstand beginning at 7 p.m. The gate prize for the evening will be a $150 gift card from A Girl’s Treasures in Comer and a $150 gift card from Madison County Ace Hardware in Danielsville.

•Thursday evening features The Country River Band performing “classic, traditional country music” on the grandstand beginning at 7 p.m. An FFA and 4-H dairy cow competition will also begin at 7 p.m. in the livestock arena. The 10 p.m. gate prize drawing for the night is a Pit Boss wood pellet grill.

•Friday night events begin with a FFA and 4-H beef cow show at 6 p.m. and the Sons of Sailors, a Jimmy Buffet tribute band, will perform on the grandstand beginning at 7:30 p.m. The gate prize drawing is at 11 p.m. that evening for a $500 gift card from Sears Hometown Store.

•Saturday’s matinee opens at noon with the 20th annual open beef cattle show. Two special prize drawings will be held at 4 p.m. (Please note that gates close at 4 p.m. and will re-open at 6 p.m.)

•Saturday evening will feature Madison County’s own Holman Autry Band on stage at 7:30 p.m. The 11 p.m. grandstand drawing will be for a Honda TRX 420 all-terrain vehicle.


Public_safety
Danielsville man sentenced to 15 years in jail

A Danielsville man was sentenced to jail time in Madison County Superior Court recently after he was convicted of selling methamphetamine.

Benny Nathaniel Mize was sentenced by Judge Lauren A. Watson to serve 15 years in confinement, with the first five years to be suspended upon the successful completion of a residential treatment program, and pay a $1,500 fine on a charge of sale of methamphetamine. Charges of possession of a controlled substance with intent to distribute and possession of drug-related objects were dismissed.

Other recent action in superior court included:

•Kathy Mae Taylor, of Danielsville, was sentenced by Judge Watson to serve 10 years of probation on charges of aggravated stalking and entering an auto. She was also sentenced by Judge Watson to serve 12 months in confinement on a charge of violation of a family violence order. A charge of criminal trespass was dismissed by Judge Watson as part of a negotiated resolution with other charges in cases.

•Milton Jack Wilcher, of Danielsville, had his charge of possession of marijuana less than an ounce moved to the dead docket where it will be dismissed if Wilcher is not arrested for a period of six months.

•John Avin King, of Hull, was sentenced by Judge Chris Phelps to serve five years of probation and pay $750 in fines on charges of reckless conduct and obstruction of a law enforcement officer. Charges of two counts of discharging a firearm near a highway or road were dismissed.

•Echar R. Powers, of Savannah, was sentenced by Judge Phelps to serve 10 years, with the first 75 days to be served in confinement and the remainder on probation and pay a $500 fine on a charge of identity fraud. Two other counts of identity fraud were dismissed.

•Casey Roy Hobbs, of Colbert, was sentenced by Judge Phelps to serve 24 months of probation and pay $5,750 in fines on charges of fleeing/attempting to elude an officer for a felony, weaving over the roadway, failure to stop for a stop sign and driving on the wrong side of the road. Charges of driving while license suspended, improper passing, visibility limitations, tire requirements and safety belt violation were dismissed.

•Antavious Dashawn Sturges, of Tignall, was sentenced by Judge Phelps to serve five years, with the first year to be served in confinement and pay a $500 fine on charges of possession of marijuana less than an ounce and possession of a firearm by a convicted felon.

•Tommy Lee Waldrup, of Hull, was sentenced by Judge Watson to serve seven days on a charge of failure to maintain lane. Charges of poseession of a Schedule IV Controlled Substance and drugs not in original container were dismissed.

•Danny Lee Hill, of Comer, was sentenced by Judge Watson to serve 12 months in confinement on charges of battery and obstruction of an officer.

•Billy Raymond Standridge, of Danielsville, had his charge of criminal damage to property dismissed by Judge Watson as part of a negotiated resolution with other charges.

•Leonard Jerry Lively, of Danielsville, had his charge of battery-family violence dismissed by Judge Watson as part of a negotiated resolution with other charges.

•Amanda Luz Alers, of Hull, had her charges of two counts of obstruction of an officer moved to the dead docket by Judge Watson and will be dismissed if she is not arrested in the next six months or upon completing 24 hours of community service, whichever occurs first.

•Babs Jeanette Smallwood, of Commerce, was sentenced by Judge Watson to serve 10 years of probation on a charge of aggravated stalking.

•Christopher Titus Poss, of Colbert, was sentenced by Judge Watson to serve five years, with the first 40 days to be served in confinement and pay a $5,000 fine on charges of insurance fraud and false report of a crime.

•Travis Lee Boothe, of Danielsville, was sentenced by Judge Watson to serve 10 years of probation and pay $1,100 in fines on charges of aggravated assault and furnishing alcohol to a minor. A charge of contributing to the delinquency of a minor was dismissed.

•Charles Clayton Gray, of Chula, was sentenced by Judge Watson to serve three years of probation and pay a $500 fine on a charge of possession of a Schedule IV Controlled Substance. Charges of possession of a controlled substance, possession of a firearm during the commission of a felony and drugs not in original container were dismissed.

•Steven Chad Smith, of Central City, Ken., was sentenced by Judge Watson to serve three years of probation and pay a $500 fine on a charge of possession of methamphetamine. Charges of possession of a Schedule I Controlled Substance, possession of drug-related objects and weaving over the roadway were dismissed.

•Rachel Loraine Roberts, of Lawrenceville, was sentenced by Judge Watson to serve three years of probation and pay $800 in fines on charges of possession of a Schedule II Controlled Substance and possession of a Schedule IV Controlled Substance. Charges of trafficking in illegal drugs and drugs not in original container were dismissed.


News
MCHS grad rate is 94.6%

Madison County High School’s recent graduation rate was once a source of community dismay, with the rate dipping below 50 percent in the early 2000s. Those days are long gone.

Recent rates have hovered around 90 percent, but this past year’s rate is even higher at 94.64 percent for the MCHS four-year cohort that graduated in the spring.

School officials praised the work of students, staff and parents.

“What an amazing accomplishment for us and our district,” said Madison County High School Principal George Bullock in a message to staff members after the announcement. “Here is proof that once again, you guys stand strong, work hard and keep moving forward. I am so proud! This is a testament to our students, our school, our school system, our BOE staff and our BOE. Our team is strong. Our team is persistent. Our team is one.”

School superintendent Michael Williams echoed Bullock’s thoughts.

“We’re extremely proud,” he said. “It’s just validation of the great things going on in our school system — the hard work of the students and staff on a day-to-day basis. We certainly still want to improve. But we want to thank our staff, students, parents and community. It takes everyone. We’re very fortunate to be here, to live here and work here.”


Features
'Artists with DisAbilities' exhibit to open Sept. 29

A reception will be held Sunday, Sept. 29, from 3 to 5 p.m. to open the "Georgia Artist With DisAbilities" exhibit at the Madison County Library.

This exhibit will be on display in the Jere Ayers room and throughout the Madison County Library and will remain through November. The mission of "Georgia Artists with DisAbilities" is to provide space through which disabled Georgia artists can show and sell their original art and create public awareness of their artistic skills. The reception will showcase the artists’ work and discuss the visions and goals of the organization. Light refreshments will be provided. This program is sponsored by the Pilot Club of Madison County and is free and open to the public of all ages and abilities.

The Pilot Club of Madison County is part of Pilot International, whose mission is to influence positive change in communities throughout the world by coming together in friendship and service, focusing on encouraging brain safety and health and supporting those who care for others.

The Madison County Library is a branch of the Athens Regional Library System, named the 2017 Georgia Public Library of the Year, and is located at 1315 Highway 98 W in Danielsville.