National Doctors’ Day is celebrated on March 30 in honor of the day Dr. Crawford W. Long performed the first painless surgery using sulphuric ether.

In the 1840s, nitrous oxide and ether were commonly used in parties, called ‘frolics.’ It was during these parties that Dr. Long discovered that those under the influence of ether felt no pain when injured.

On March 30, 1842, Dr. Long performed what is considered the first surgery aided by anesthesia. Ninety-one years later, in 1933, the first Doctors’ Day observance was held in Barrow County, Georgia due to the efforts of Eudora Brown Almond, a local physician’s wife. Mrs. Almond presented her medical auxiliary with the idea of setting aside a special day to honor Doctors of Medicine; and the auxiliary adopted a resolution designating the day of March 30th each year as Doctors’ Day in honor of the date the famous Jefferson, Georgia resident, Dr. Crawford W. Long, first used ether as anesthesia.

As part of its National Doctors’ Day celebration, museum staff and volunteers prepare and present local physicians with red carnations, the symbol of Doctors’ Day.

“Doctors’ Day and Dr. Long’s legacy serve as reminders of the debt society owes its physicians,” said Vicki Starnes, Crawford Long Museum Director. “Their contributions and sacrifices are often overlooked in today’s tumultuous healthcare environment.”

The museum will team with Piedmont Athens Regional to place a memorial wreath on the Long Monument at 10 a.m. on Thursday, March 26.

"We are honored to help recognize each and every physician for the contributions they make to our community. Not only do they keep us safe and healthy but also for the many sacrifices they make. Piedmont Athens Regional is proud to show support to all doctors on National Doctors’ Day with the team at Crawford W. Long Museum," stated Tricia Massey, Business Development Specialist.

Although Doctors’ Day was initiated in the State of Georgia, today it is celebrated across the United States and overseas as well; it is indeed fitting that the Crawford Long Museum pay tribute to these dedicated individuals.

To learn more about Dr. Crawford W. Long, visit the museum’s site at www.crawfordlong.org.

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