A Jefferson man was arrested on multiple charges, including federal charges for striking two children, following a domestic dispute on Peachtree Street in Colbert.

Justin Taylor Lytle, 21, was ultimately charged with aggravated battery, simple battery, two counts of battery, two counts of federal cruelty to children in the second degree and two counts of cruelty to children in the third degree.

On Sunday, April 25, about 10:19 p.m. Deputy Gary Floyd was dispatched to the home where a woman told him that Lytle had just hit and injured both of her children, punched her in the face and had been in an altercation with his (Lytle’s) fiancée.

Floyd noted that one of the children had a busted lower lip and another had a possible broken left arm where she had been forcibly grabbed.

The woman (the children’s mother) showed him her face where she had been punched, reportedly by Lytle.

Lytle was located inside a bedroom where he was speaking with the homeowner. The homeowner told him that Lytle and his fiancée had resided at the home for about five months, and that the mother and her two children have been living there for about a month.

Lytle told Floyd that "me and my old lady was arguing and everybody else was wanting to get into it."

He also said he had been drinking alcohol.

He denied putting his hands on the children and said he had no idea what their mother was talking about.

His fiancée said he had struck her and knocked her down during an argument and hit her on her neck and upper chest. She had also reportedly struck her head during the fall.

The children reportedly were injured by Lytle when they got in the middle of the altercation trying to assist the fiancée and their mother was struck trying to get her children out of the way.

He was arrested under the Family Violence Act since all the parties lived together.

In another incident, Timothy Wayne McLendon, 38, was charged with aggravated assault, aggravated battery, false imprisonment, obstructing or hindering persons making a 911 call, simple assault family violence and felony sodomy.

Sgt. Mark Goodson was dispatched to Comer city hall on the morning of April 21 where he met an injured woman, who said she had escaped McLendon’s home. She told Goodson that McLendon had beaten her up after she went home with him following a gathering at a Comer home where both of them had smoked marijuana.

Goodson noted that her right eye was swollen shut and she had bruises all over her legs.

She said McLendon attacked her in the kitchen after he knocked over a bucket of bleach water, calling her obscenities and ordering her to get on the floor and clean up the water. She said while on the floor he punched and kicked her. She said she ran outside but he followed and tackled her to the ground continuing to kick and punch her, then ordered her to go back inside.

She said she was afraid of him so did as he said. They smoked more marijuana the next morning and she tried to leave again. She said McLendon forced her to change her clothing first, then gave her keys to her and she drove to city hall seeking help.

The victim had more injuries on her spine, her back and breasts and had fingerprint markings on an arm. She also had blood down the front of her shirt that she said happened when McLendon punched her in the nose. She said more blood was located on another shirt left behind at the house. She also told Goodson she had been living with McLendon before this incident and had a key to the house, which she produced. She agreed to go the hospital for her injuries.

Goodson then went to McLendon’s home where he found the front door open. No one was inside but as Goodson was leaving and locking the house he saw McLendon pull into the driveway. He asked Goodson if the victim had been found and if she was OK.

Goodson told him he had spoken to the victim and that he needed to speak with him. McLendon told him the victim came to his house that morning and “looked as if she had been beaten up” and he invited her inside in an offer to help her. He said she was “acting weird” and left, so he went to find her and make sure she was OK. He denied having struck her and said he “was not that kind of guy.”

He was arrested and taken to jail. Later that day, Goodson received a report that the victim’s nose was broken in two places, as was the orbital socket around her eye.

Other incidents on file at the sheriff’s office this week included:

•A couple on Piedmont Road reported that an 11-year old girl had showed up at their home and told them she had been sleeping in the woods since her parents were killed in a car wreck. Deputy Mason Bennett went to the home where he met with them and the child. The child said her parents were killed several days before but she didn’t know where it had happened. Her father showed up shortly after and told Bennett she had run away from home. DFACS was informed of the incident. Her father noted she had “run away” before, but that she usually hides in their home somewhere. He said she had been fighting with her brother over Legos.

•Tommanesha Sha’untae Heard, 18, of Colbert, was charged with one count of aggravated assault following a 911 call from a home on Fleming St. in Colbert about a domestic incident with injuries.

Deputy Austin Shubert was dispatched to the scene where Heard allegedly struck another female with her car while fleeing the scene.

The victim was the grandmother of a girl who was allegedly having problems with four other girls at school and they had come to the home wanting to fight her. Heard was the driver of the car that struck the victim as she left.

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